• Clarkson GO Station Tim Hortons

    Metrolinx will start installing a Tim Hortons trailer on the south side of the station near the Kiss & Ride next week, however they will need to relocate the existing bike rack. Bicycles will need to be removed before this Saturday, June 17th to make way for the trailer. Any bikes that have been left behind will be stored by our Station Operations team on-site in a secure location, customers can call 1-800-Get-On-Go to locate their bike if it has been removed.

     

  • Splash and Stay Cool at a City Spray Pad, Pool or Park Near You

    Residents can beat the heat this summer at City pools and spray pads or enjoy some shade at a neighbourhood park. During extreme heat, residents can stay cool by visiting a nearby air-conditioned library or one of 11 community centres.

    Spray Pads

    All summer long, kids can enjoy any of the 26 spray pads in Mississauga (weather permitting). All spray pads are unsupervised and open at 9 a.m. For more information on spray pads available in your neighbourhood, visit our webpage.

    Pools

    City-operated pools are safe and supervised by highly-trained City staff. The City operates 11 indoor pools that are open all year. The indoor pools offer a variety of aquatic programs, drop-in swims and lessons for all ages. For a limited time (June 1 to June 30), the City is offering a Pool Splash Pass that allows kids to swim all summer for $40. The City also operates seven outdoor pools that are set to open on June 24.

    Parks

    Mississauga has more than 480 parks, 295 km of trails and woodlands for residents to explore and discover. The summer is a perfect time to discover one of the Mississauga’s many scenic parks or trails. Enjoy a picnic, go for a stroll or relax under the shade of some trees. For information about city parks and amenities, visit eparks.ca.

  • Sheridan Park Drive Extension Environmental Assessment

     

  • Cankerworm Update

    I wanted to take this opportunity to provide all of you with an update on the cankerworm situation in our area.

     

    As you know, for the last number of years, our neighbourhoods, especially in the Lorne Park / White Oaks Area have been plagued with the Emerald Ash Borer, Gypsy Moth, Cankerworms, ice storms and drought.

     

    Our beautiful tree canopy is taking a hit that I’m not sure can recover from unless we aerial spray. Unfortunately, we have missed the window of opportunity for this year.

     

    I feel, that as a Council, we need to send a message to our residents and show our commitment to preserving our tree canopy.  Even the City’s integrated pest management plan is no match for the constant barrage of pests we are experiencing.

     

    For residents, treatment for each tree can cost upwards of $500 – $1000, not to mention the removal of dead trees, where the average price per tree is around $2000. The point is that homeowners are spending a lot of money to improve the survival of the trees and the City needs to do more to help.

     

    I can honestly say that for me, this year has been like no other. Many people have referred to the ‘horror film’ conditions. Just yesterday, a resident complained of the worms coming down her chimney into her home.

     

    Not being able to use your yards, caterpillar feces raining down, the ground appearing to move under your feet and most heartbreakingly – already stressed trees having their leaves eaten – I’m not sure how much more these trees can take. We are at a tipping point.

     

    We need to continue to invest in our urban tree canopy, even if that means conducting aerial spraying every few years.

     

    The last time the city aerial sprayed BTK was 10 years ago. BTK is soil-dwelling bacterium, commonly used as a biological pesticide and is effective in the control of cankerworms and gypsy moth and safe for use in urban areas.

     

    Today Council considered my walk-on motion to consider aerial spraying for Spring 2018 and a commitment to work in a permanent program for spraying every few years.

     

    Some Councillors expressed concerns about the cost and plan for communications.

     

    The motion was amended to read, “Be it resolved that the City of Mississauga Forestry staff be directed to report back in the Fall 2017 with a plan regarding aerial spraying, the areas that will be sprayed, the costs and the communications plan.” 

     

    I am cautiously optimistic that we will move forward, but it is not yet a done deal.

     

    What do I need from you, the residents of Ward 2?

     

    1. I need you to continue to advocate for spraying to other Councillors, the Mayor and City officials, to keep it top of mind until the matter comes before Council again in the Fall.

     

    1. I need you to keep me informed. City staff said that these trees “should” regrow their leaves. Based on what I’ve seen, oak trees tend not to. Continue to keep me updated on your properties and how our trees are faring over the summer months.

     

    This matter will come forward again for a final decision in the Fall and I will continue to make the case, so we can move forward for aerial spraying in Spring 2018.  You will be notified as soon as possible when it will be coming forward, along with the corporate report.

     

    I’d like to sincerely thank each and every one of you for your support and vigilance on this matter.

  • Cankerworm Update – June 6th

    I will be bringing forward the below motion at Council tomorrow morning. I have received many photos from residents impacted by this infestation and these too will be part of my presentation to the Mayor and my fellow Councillors.

     

    Also, below is a link to a City News item from yesterday, which I’m sure many of you saw. It does a good job of highlighting the challenges that we are dealing with in Lorne Park.

     

    http://www.citynews.ca/video/2017/06/05/video-cankerworm-infestation-takes-over-mississauga-neighbourhood/

     

    I will continue to keep you updated on this matter.

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