• Emergency Road Closure: Lorne Park Road south of Indian Road – April 10 & 11

  • Open House for 2018 Aerial Spray Program to Combat Cankerworms and Gypsy Moths – April 10

    This spring, the City of Mississauga is conducting an aerial spray. The spray will lower fall cankerworm and gypsy moth caterpillar populations and prevent tree loss. To prepare for the spray, the City is hosting five information open house events for those who live or work in the designated spray areas.

    City staff will share details about the spray, explain how to control fall cankerworm and gypsy moth caterpillars on private property and provide an overview about the long-term health of Mississauga’s tree canopy.

  • Major Development Applications for Ward 2 – April 2018

  • Report Recommends Regulation of Short-Term Accommodations in Mississauga

    A staff report presented on December 4th to City of Mississauga’s Planning and Development Committee recommends amendments to the Zoning By-law to regulate short-term accommodations (STAs) in the City.  The recommendations include allowing STAs in all dwelling types that are primary residences, subject to conditions.

     

    The report also includes an update on responses from an online survey and public consultation process as well as an updated municipal scan and recommendations to amend the Zoning By-law to regulate STAs.

     

    The City’s Zoning By-law currently does not prohibit STAs. Council directed Enforcement staff to further examine STAs in Mississauga, consult with stakeholders and recommend options for regulatory control within three months.

     

    According to the report, the proposed amendments:

     

    • define short-term accommodation as the use of all or part of a dwelling unit, used by the owner or leaseholder as their principal residence, for temporary overnight accommodation for 28 days or less;
    • define a principal residence according to the Income Tax Act;
    • permit STAs in all principal residences in the City of Mississauga, in all types of residential units for 28 days or less; and
    • Require a minor variance or rezoning application to permit an STA in a dwelling that is not a principal residence. This will allow condominium boards, neighbours and property managers to comment on the application and City departments to evaluate the request. If a minor variance application is submitted, the Committee of Adjustment can impose conditions of approval including time limits.

     

    The report also cites that similar regulations are proposed in Toronto and Vancouver and are already in place in New York City, Philadelphia, Portland and San Francisco.

     

    There are existing by-laws to address nuisance concerns that may be related to STAs. Under these by-laws, City staff respond to any complaints in the community as they arise.

     

    “The proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law represent a balanced approach to regulating short-term accommodations in Mississauga,” said Ed Sajecki, Commissioner, Planning and Building. “They clarify how residents can share their principal residences with others, while limiting the potential impacts on housing availability and affordability. They also provide some additional protection to buildings and neighbourhoods.”

     

    Staff are also considering the potential to tax short-term accommodations. On November 1 at General Committee, Council approved in principle the introduction of a four per cent hotel tax effective July 1, 2018. 

    As next steps, staff will present the proposed Zoning By-law amendments to Council for approval in early 2018.The Enforcement Division will report to General Committee on a possible registry or licensing regime for short-term accommodations to reduce the potential for nuisance impacts in buildings and neighbourhoods.

  • Cankerworm Update

    I wanted to take this opportunity to provide all of you with an update on the cankerworm situation in our area.

     

    As you know, for the last number of years, our neighbourhoods, especially in the Lorne Park / White Oaks Area have been plagued with the Emerald Ash Borer, Gypsy Moth, Cankerworms, ice storms and drought.

     

    Our beautiful tree canopy is taking a hit that I’m not sure can recover from unless we aerial spray. Unfortunately, we have missed the window of opportunity for this year.

     

    I feel, that as a Council, we need to send a message to our residents and show our commitment to preserving our tree canopy.  Even the City’s integrated pest management plan is no match for the constant barrage of pests we are experiencing.

     

    For residents, treatment for each tree can cost upwards of $500 – $1000, not to mention the removal of dead trees, where the average price per tree is around $2000. The point is that homeowners are spending a lot of money to improve the survival of the trees and the City needs to do more to help.

     

    I can honestly say that for me, this year has been like no other. Many people have referred to the ‘horror film’ conditions. Just yesterday, a resident complained of the worms coming down her chimney into her home.

     

    Not being able to use your yards, caterpillar feces raining down, the ground appearing to move under your feet and most heartbreakingly – already stressed trees having their leaves eaten – I’m not sure how much more these trees can take. We are at a tipping point.

     

    We need to continue to invest in our urban tree canopy, even if that means conducting aerial spraying every few years.

     

    The last time the city aerial sprayed BTK was 10 years ago. BTK is soil-dwelling bacterium, commonly used as a biological pesticide and is effective in the control of cankerworms and gypsy moth and safe for use in urban areas.

     

    Today Council considered my walk-on motion to consider aerial spraying for Spring 2018 and a commitment to work in a permanent program for spraying every few years.

     

    Some Councillors expressed concerns about the cost and plan for communications.

     

    The motion was amended to read, “Be it resolved that the City of Mississauga Forestry staff be directed to report back in the Fall 2017 with a plan regarding aerial spraying, the areas that will be sprayed, the costs and the communications plan.” 

     

    I am cautiously optimistic that we will move forward, but it is not yet a done deal.

     

    What do I need from you, the residents of Ward 2?

     

    1. I need you to continue to advocate for spraying to other Councillors, the Mayor and City officials, to keep it top of mind until the matter comes before Council again in the Fall.

     

    1. I need you to keep me informed. City staff said that these trees “should” regrow their leaves. Based on what I’ve seen, oak trees tend not to. Continue to keep me updated on your properties and how our trees are faring over the summer months.

     

    This matter will come forward again for a final decision in the Fall and I will continue to make the case, so we can move forward for aerial spraying in Spring 2018.  You will be notified as soon as possible when it will be coming forward, along with the corporate report.

     

    I’d like to sincerely thank each and every one of you for your support and vigilance on this matter.

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